IDRA_Current_Folio_10Q2

Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-Q

 


QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2018

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For transition period from                      to                     .  

 

Commission File Number: 001-31918

 


Picture 1

IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 


 

 

 

 

Delaware

    

04-3072298

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

505 Eagleview Blvd., Suite 212

Exton, Pennsylvania

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

19341

(Zip code)

 

(484) 348-1600

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

167 Sidney Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

(Former Name or Former Address, if Changed Since Last Report)


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

 

 

 

Common Stock, par value $.001 per share

    

27,173,853

Class

 

Outstanding as of July 31, 2018

 

 

 


 

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IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

FORM 10-Q

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Page

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements

 

1

 

Condensed Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017

 

1

 

Condensed Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2018 and 2017

 

2

 

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2018 and 2017

 

3

 

Condensed Statement of Stockholders’ Equity for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2018

 

4

 

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

 

5

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

23

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

37

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

 

38

 

 

 

 

PART II — OTHER INFORMATION 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

 

39

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

 

39

Item 5.

Other Information

 

40

Item 6.

Exhibits

 

41

 

 

 

 

 

Signatures

 

42

 

IMO® and Idera® are our trademarks. All other trademarks and service marks appearing in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are the property of their respective owners.

 


 

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NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, included or incorporated in this report regarding our strategy, future operations, clinical trials, collaborations, intellectual property, cash resources, financial position, future revenues, projected costs, prospects, plans, and objectives of management are forward-looking statements. The words “believes,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “plans,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “could,” “should,” “potential,” “likely,” “projects,” “continue,” “will,” and “would” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We cannot guarantee that we actually will achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements.

 

There are a number of important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated or implied by forward-looking statements. These important factors include those set forth below under Part II, Item 1A “Risk Factors” in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and under Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, on March 7, 2018. These factors and the other cautionary statements made in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q should be read as being applicable to all related forward-looking statements whenever they appear in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

 

In addition, any forward-looking statements represent our estimates only as of the date that this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q is filed with the SEC and should not be relied upon as representing our estimates as of any subsequent date. We do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements. We disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

 

 

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PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements.

 

IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

 

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

June 30, 

    

December 31, 

 

 

 

2018

 

2017*

 

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

94,046

 

$

112,629

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

3,923

 

 

3,992

 

Total current assets

 

 

97,969

 

 

116,621

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

1,225

 

 

1,472

 

Restricted cash and other assets

 

 

320

 

 

324

 

Total assets

 

$

99,514

 

$

118,417

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

1,118

 

$

1,334

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

12,721

 

 

8,000

 

Note payable

 

 

 —

 

 

209

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

235

 

 

566

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

14,074

 

 

10,109

 

Other liabilities

 

 

374

 

 

613

 

Total liabilities

 

 

14,448

 

 

10,722

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, Authorized — 5,000 shares:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series A convertible preferred stock; Designated — 1,500 shares, Issued and outstanding — 1 share

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value, Authorized — 70,000 shares; Issued and outstanding — 27,171 and 24,453 shares at June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively

 

 

27

 

 

24

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

725,659

 

 

712,165

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(640,620)

 

 

(604,494)

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

85,066

 

 

107,695

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

99,514

 

$

118,417

 


* The condensed consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2017 has been derived from the audited financial statements at that date.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

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IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

 

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

(UNAUDITED)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 

 

June 30, 

 

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

    

2018

    

2017

    

2018

    

2017

 

Alliance revenue

 

$

163

 

$

187

 

$

418

 

$

565

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

10,880

 

 

17,891

 

 

24,436

 

 

29,376

 

General and administrative

 

 

5,583

 

 

3,888

 

 

12,562

 

 

7,969

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

16,463

 

 

21,779

 

 

36,998

 

 

37,345

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(16,300)

 

 

(21,592)

 

 

(36,580)

 

 

(36,780)

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

 

271

 

 

144

 

 

482

 

 

297

 

Interest expense

 

 

(4)

 

 

(13)

 

 

(11)

 

 

(29)

 

Foreign currency exchange gain (loss)

 

 

 2

 

 

(10)

 

 

(17)

 

 

(16)

 

Net loss

 

$

(16,031)

 

$

(21,471)

 

$

(36,126)

 

$

(36,528)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per share applicable to common stockholders - basic and diluted (Note 11)

 

$

(0.59)

 

$

(1.15)

 

$

(1.39)

 

$

(1.96)

 

Weighted-average number of common shares used in computing net loss per share applicable to common stockholders - basic and diluted

 

 

27,133

 

 

18,676

 

 

26,012

 

 

18,657

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(16,031)

 

$

(21,471)

 

$

(36,126)

 

$

(36,528)

 

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

16

 

Total other comprehensive income

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

16

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(16,031)

 

$

(21,471)

 

$

(36,126)

 

$

(36,512)

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

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IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

 

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(UNAUDITED)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 

 

(In thousands)

    

2018

    

2017

 

Cash Flows from Operating Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(36,126)

 

$

(36,528)

 

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

3,127

 

 

7,542

 

Issuance of common stock for services rendered

 

 

45

 

 

74

 

Accretion of discounts and premiums on investments

 

 

 —

 

 

92

 

Depreciation and amortization expense

 

 

321

 

 

368

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

69

 

 

(2,179)

 

Accounts payable, accrued expenses, and other liabilities

 

 

4,243

 

 

(779)

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

(331)

 

 

(465)

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(28,652)

 

 

(31,875)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash Flows from Investing Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from maturity of available-for-sale securities

 

 

 —

 

 

25,695

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(42)

 

 

(100)

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

 

 

(42)

 

 

25,595

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash Flows from Financing Activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from employee stock purchases

 

 

159

 

 

115

 

Proceeds from exercise of common stock options and warrants

 

 

10,166

 

 

304

 

Payments on note payable

 

 

(209)

 

 

(142)

 

Payments on capital lease

 

 

(5)

 

 

(5)

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

10,111

 

 

272

 

Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

 

(18,583)

 

 

(6,008)

 

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, beginning of period

 

 

112,940

 

 

80,978

 

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period

 

$

94,357

 

$

74,970

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

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IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(UNAUDITED)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Number of

 

$0.001 Par

 

Paid-In

 

Accumulated

 

Stockholders’

 

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 

Shares

 

Value

 

Capital

 

Deficit

 

Equity

 

Balance, December 31, 2017

 

24,453

 

$

24

 

$

712,165

 

$

(604,494)

 

$

107,695

 

Issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase plan

 

13

 

 

 —

 

 

159

 

 

 —

 

 

159

 

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of common stock options and warrants

 

2,702

 

 

 3

 

 

10,163

 

 

 —

 

 

10,166

 

Issuance of common stock for services rendered

 

 3

 

 

 —

 

 

45

 

 

 —

 

 

45

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

3,127

 

 

 —

 

 

3,127

 

Net loss

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(36,126)

 

 

(36,126)

 

Balance, June 30, 2018

 

27,171

 

$

27

 

$

725,659

 

$

(640,620)

 

$

85,066

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

 

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IDERA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

June 30, 2018

 

(UNAUDITED)

 

Note 1.  Business and Organization

 

Business Overview

 

Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Idera” or the “Company”), a Delaware corporation, is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company currently focused on the development, and ultimately the commercialization of therapeutic drug candidates, including our Toll-like receptor (“TLR”) agonist, tilsotolimod (IMO-2125), for oncology. The Company’s business strategy is focused on the clinical development of drug candidates for oncology indications characterized by small, well-defined patient populations with serious unmet medical needs. The Company believes it can develop and commercialize these targeted therapies on its own.  To the extent the Company seeks to develop drug candidates for broader disease indications, it has entered into and may explore additional collaborative alliances to support development and commercialization.

 

Agreement and Plan of Merger

 

On January 21, 2018, the Company, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“BioCryst”), Nautilus Holdco, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a direct, wholly owned subsidiary of BioCryst (“Holdco”), Island Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a direct, wholly owned subsidiary of Holdco, and Boat Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a direct, wholly owned subsidiary of Holdco, entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Merger Agreement”). The board of directors of each of Idera and BioCryst unanimously approved the Merger Agreement and the transactions contemplated thereby and the required regulatory approvals were received. However, the proposed merger was subject to approval by the stockholders of Idera and BioCryst, and satisfaction of other customary closing conditions, as specified in the Merger Agreement. At a special meeting of BioCryst stockholders held on July 10, 2018, BioCryst’s stockholders voted against the adoption of the Merger Agreement.  Following such vote and in accordance with the terms of the Merger Agreement, BioCryst terminated the Merger Agreement.  See Note 12.

 

Liquidity and Financial Condition

 

As of June 30, 2018, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $640.6 million. The Company expects to incur substantial operating losses in future periods and will require additional capital as it seeks to advance tilsotolimod and any future drug candidates through development to commercialization. The Company does not expect to generate product revenue, sales-based milestones or royalties until the Company successfully completes development and obtains marketing approval for tilsotolimod or other future drug candidates, either alone or in collaboration with third parties, which the Company expects will take a number of years. In order to commercialize tilsotolimod and any future drug candidates, the Company needs to complete clinical development and comply with comprehensive regulatory requirements. The Company is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties similar to those of other companies of the same size within the biotechnology industry, such as uncertainty of clinical trial outcomes, uncertainty of additional funding, and history of operating losses.

   

The Company believes, based on its current operating plan, that its existing cash and cash equivalents will enable the Company to fund its operations into the first quarter of 2020. The Company has and plans to continue to evaluate available alternatives to extend its operations beyond the first quarter of 2020.

 

Reverse Stock Split

 

As further described in Note 12, on July 27, 2018, the Company effected a 1-for-8 reverse stock split of the Company's outstanding shares of common stock, as authorized at a special meeting of stockholders on June 20, 2018. All share and per share amounts of common stock, options and warrants in the accompanying condensed financial statements and notes thereto have been retroactively adjusted for all periods presented to reflect the reverse stock split.

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Note 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited financial statements included herein have been prepared by the Company in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Accordingly, certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, and disclosures considered necessary for a fair presentation of interim period results have been included. Interim results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2018. For further information, refer to the financial statements and footnotes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017 (“2017 Form 10-K”), which was filed with the SEC on March 7, 2018.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturities of 90 days or less when purchased to be “cash equivalents.” Cash and cash equivalents at June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 consisted of cash and money market funds.

 

Restricted Cash

 

As part of the Company’s lease arrangement for its office and laboratory facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the Company is required to restrict cash held in a certificate of deposit securing a line of credit for the lessor. As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the restricted cash amounted to $0.3 million and is recorded in “Restricted cash and other assets” in the accompanying balance sheets. In July 2018, the Company terminated the lease agreement, effective September 30, 2018, as more fully described in Note 12, and will no longer be required to restrict cash for this purpose as of such date.

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash reported within the balance sheets that sum to the total of the same such amounts shown in the statements of cash flows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

June 30, 

 

December 31,

(In thousands)

 

2018

    

2017

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

94,046

 

$

112,629

Restricted cash

 

 

311

 

 

311

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

$

94,357

 

$

112,940

 

Financial Instruments

 

The fair value of the Company’s financial instruments is determined and disclosed in accordance with the three-tier fair value hierarchy specified in Note 3. The Company is required to disclose the estimated fair values of its financial instruments. As of June 30, 2018, the Company’s financial instruments consisted of cash, cash equivalents, and accounts receivable.  As of December 31, 2017, the Company’s financial instruments consisted of cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable and a note payable. The estimated fair values of these financial instruments approximate their carrying values as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017. As of June 30, 2018, the Company did not have any derivatives, hedging instruments or other similar financial instruments. 

 

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Note 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Effective January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, using the modified retrospective transition method. Under this method, the Company recognizes the cumulative effect of initially adopting ASC Topic 606, if any, as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings.  Additionally, under this method of adoption, the Company applies the guidance to all incomplete contracts in scope as of the date of initial application. This standard applies to all contracts with customers, except for contracts that are within the scope of other standards, such as leases, insurance, collaboration arrangements and financial instruments.

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 606, the Company recognizes revenue when its customer obtains control of promised goods or services, in an amount that reflects the consideration which the entity expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. To determine revenue recognition for arrangements that the Company determines are within the scope of ASC Topic 606, it performs the following five steps:

(i)

identify the contract(s) with a customer;

(ii)

identify the performance obligations in the contract;

(iii)

determine the transaction price;

(iv)

allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract; and

(v)

recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation.

 

The Company only applies the five-step model to contracts when it determines that it is probable it will collect the consideration it is entitled to in exchange for the goods or services it transfers to the customer. At contract inception, once the contract is determined to be within the scope of ASC Topic 606, the Company assesses the goods or services promised within each contract and determines those that are performance obligations, and assesses whether each promised good or service is distinct. The Company then recognizes as revenue the amount of the transaction price that is allocated to the respective performance obligation when (or as) the performance obligation is satisfied.

 

Amounts received prior to satisfying the revenue recognition criteria are recognized as deferred revenue in the Company’s balance sheet.  Amounts expected to be recognized as revenue within the 12 months following the balance sheet date are classified as Current portion of deferred revenue.  Amounts not expected to be recognized as revenue within the 12 months following the balance sheet date are classified as Deferred revenue, net of current portion.

 

Alliance Revenues

 

The Company’s revenues have primarily been generated through collaborative research, development and/or commercialization agreements.  The terms of these agreements may include payment to the Company of one or more of the following: nonrefundable, up-front license fees; research, development and commercial milestone payments; and other contingent payments due based on the activities of the counterparty or the reimbursement by licensees of costs associated with patent maintenance.  Each of these types of revenue are recorded as Alliance revenues in the Company’s statement of operations.

 

In determining the appropriate amount of revenue to be recognized as it fulfills its obligations under each of its agreements, the Company performs the following steps:

(i)

identification of the promised goods or services in the contract;

(ii)

determination of whether the promised goods or services are performance obligations including whether they are distinct in the context of the contract;

(iii)

measurement of the transaction price, including the constraint on variable consideration;

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Note 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

 

(iv)

allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations; and

(v)

recognition of revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies each performance obligation.

 

See Note 8, “Collaboration and License Agreements” for additional details regarding the Company’s collaboration arrangements.

 

As part of the accounting for these arrangements, the Company allocates the transaction price to each performance obligation on a relative stand-alone selling price basis. The stand-alone selling price may be, but is not presumed to be, the contract price. In determining the allocation, the Company maximizes the use of observable inputs.  When the stand-alone selling price of a good or service is not directly observable, the Company estimates the stand-alone selling price for each performance obligation using assumptions that require judgment. Acceptable estimation methods include, but are not limited to: (i) the adjusted market assessment approach, (ii) the expected cost plus margin approach, and (iii) the residual approach (when the stand-alone selling price is not directly observable and is either highly variable or uncertain). In order for the residual approach to be used, the Company must demonstrate that (a) there are observable stand-alone selling prices for one or more of the performance obligations and (b) one of the two criteria in ASC 606-10- 32-34(c)(1) and (2) is met. The residual approach cannot be used if it would result in a stand-alone selling price of zero for a performance obligation as a performance obligation, by definition, has value on a stand-alone basis.

 

An option in a contract to acquire additional goods or services gives rise to a performance obligation only if the option provides a material right to the customer that it would not receive without entering into that contract. Factors that the Company considers in evaluating whether an option represents a material right include, but are not limited to: (i) the overall objective of the arrangement, (ii) the benefit the collaborator might obtain from the arrangement without exercising the option, (iii) the cost to exercise the option (e.g. priced at a significant and incremental discount) and (iv) the likelihood that the option will be exercised. With respect to options determined to be performance obligations, the Company recognizes revenue when those future goods or services are transferred or when the options expire.

 

The Company’s revenue arrangements may include the following:

 

Up-front License Fees: If a license is determined to be distinct from the other performance obligations identified in the arrangement, the Company recognizes revenues from nonrefundable, up-front fees allocated to the license when the license is transferred to the licensee and the licensee is able to use and benefit from the license. For licenses that are bundled with other promises, the Company utilizes judgment to assess the nature of the combined performance obligation to determine whether the combined performance obligation is satisfied over time or at a point in time and, if over time, the appropriate method of measuring progress for purposes of recognizing revenue from non-refundable, up-front fees. The Company evaluates the measure of progress each reporting period and, if necessary, adjusts the measure of performance and related revenue recognition.

 

Milestone Payments: At the inception of an agreement that includes research and development milestone payments, the Company evaluates whether each milestone is considered probable of being achieved and estimates the amount to be included in the transaction price using the most likely amount method. If it is probable that a significant revenue reversal would not occur, the associated milestone value is included in the transaction price. Milestone payments that are not within the control of the Company or the licensee, such as regulatory approvals, are not considered probable of being achieved until those approvals are received. The transaction price is then allocated to each performance obligation on a relative stand-alone selling price basis, for which the Company recognizes revenue as or when the performance obligations under the contract are satisfied. At the end of each subsequent reporting period, the Company re-evaluates the probability of achievement of such milestones and any related constraint, and if necessary, adjusts its estimate of the overall transaction price. Any such adjustments are recorded on a cumulative catch-up basis, which would affect Alliance revenues and earnings in the period of adjustment.

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Note 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

 

Research and Development Activities: If the Company is entitled to reimbursement from its collaborators for specified research and development activities or the reimbursement of costs associated with patent maintenance, the Company determines whether such funding would result in Alliance revenues or an offset to research and development expenses. Reimbursement of patent maintenance costs are recognized during the period in which the related expenses are incurred as Alliance revenues in the Company’s statement of operations.

 

Royalties: If the Company is entitled to receive sales-based royalties from its collaborator, including milestone payments based on the level of sales, and the license is deemed to be the predominant item to which the royalties relate, the Company recognizes revenue at the later of (i) when the related sales occur, provided the reported sales are reliably measurable, or (ii) when the performance obligation to which some or all of the royalty has been allocated has been satisfied (or partially satisfied). To date, the Company has not recognized any royalty revenue resulting from any of its collaboration and license arrangements.

 

Manufacturing Supply and Research Services: Arrangements that include a promise for future supply of drug substance, drug product or research services at the licensee’s discretion are generally considered as options. The Company assesses if these options provide a material right to the licensee and if so, they are accounted for as separate performance obligations. If the Company is entitled to additional payments when the licensee exercises these options, any additional payments are recorded in Alliance revenues when the licensee obtains control of the goods, which is upon delivery, or as the services are performed.

 

The Company receives payments from its licensees based on schedules established in each contract. Upfront payments and fees are recorded as deferred revenue upon receipt, and may require deferral of revenue recognition to a future period until the Company performs its obligations under these arrangements. Amounts are recorded as accounts receivable when the Company’s right to consideration is unconditional. The Company does not assess whether a contract has a significant financing component if the expectation at contract inception is such that the period between payment by the licensees and the transfer of the promised goods or services to the licensees will be one year or less.

 

Income Taxes

 

In accordance with ASC 270, Interim Reporting, and ASC 740, Income Taxes, the Company is required at the end of each interim period to determine the best estimate of its annual effective tax rate and then apply that rate in providing for income taxes on a current year-to-date (interim period) basis.  For the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded no tax expense or benefit due to the expected current year loss and its historical losses.  The Company has not recorded its net deferred tax asset as of either June 30, 2018 or December 31, 2017 because it maintained a full valuation allowance against all deferred tax assets as of these dates as management has determined that it is not more likely than not that the Company will realize these future tax benefits. As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company had no uncertain tax positions.

 

In December 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”) was signed into law. Among other things, the TCJA permanently lowers the corporate federal income tax rate to 21% from the existing maximum rate of 35%, effective for tax years including or commencing January 1, 2018. As a result of the reduction of the corporate federal income tax rate to 21%, GAAP requires companies to revalue their deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities as of the date of enactment, with the resulting tax effects accounted for in the reporting period of enactment. This revaluation resulted in a provision of $27.6 million to income tax expense and a corresponding reduction in the valuation allowance in the fourth quarter of 2017. As a result, there was no impact to the Company’s statement of operations and comprehensive loss as a result of reduction in tax rates. The Company’s preliminary estimate of the TCJA and the remeasurement of its deferred tax assets and liabilities is subject to the finalization of management’s analysis related to certain matters, such as developing interpretations of the provisions of the TCJA, changes to certain estimates and the filing of the Company’s tax returns. U.S. Treasury regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions interpreting the TCJA may require further adjustments and changes in the Company’s estimates. The final determination of the TCJA and the remeasurement of the Company’s deferred assets and liabilities will be completed as additional information becomes available, but no later than one year from the enactment of the TCJA.

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Note 2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which was subsequently amended by several other ASU’s related to Topic 606 to, among other things, defer the effective date and clarify various aspects of the new revenue guidance including principal versus agent considerations, identifying performance obligations, and licensing, and include other improvements and practical expedients (as amended, “ASU 2014-09”). The Company adopted ASU 2014-09 in the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective transition method. See “Revenue Recognition” above.  To date, the Company has derived substantially all of its revenues from a limited number of license and collaboration agreements. The consideration the Company is eligible to receive under these agreements includes upfront payments, research and development funding, contingent revenues in the form of commercial and development milestones and option payments and royalties. Each of the Company’s license and collaboration agreements has unique terms and was evaluated separately under Topic 606. With respect to its license and collaboration agreements with Vivelix Pharmaceuticals, Ltd. (“Vivelix”) and GlaxoSmithKline Intellectual Property Development Limited (“GSK”),  there was no material impact to Alliance revenues for any of the years presented upon adoption of Topic 606.  Additionally, there were no revisions to any balance sheet components of Alliance revenues such as accounts receivable and deferred revenues or beginning retained earnings as a result of the adoption of the modified retrospective method. The primary impact on the Company’s financial statements was that revised or additional disclosures were made with respect to revenues and cash flows arising from contracts with customers, which are included in Notes 7 and 8.

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-01, Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (“ASU 2016-01”). The amendments in ASU 2016-01 address certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of financial instruments. The Company adopted ASU 2016-01 in the first quarter of 2018. The adoption of this new standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.

 

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) — Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”)The amendments in ASU 2016-18 require that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents. Accordingly, amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents should be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning of period and end of period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. The Company adopted ASU 2016-18 in the first quarter of 2018, and the guidance has been retrospectively applied to all periods presented. The total of the Company’s cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash is described earlier in this Note 2.

 

Recently Issued (Not Yet Adopted) Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (“ASU 2016-02”).  ASU 2016-02 requires organizations that lease assets, with lease terms of more than 12 months, to recognize on the balance sheet the assets and liabilities for the rights and obligations created by those leases. Consistent with GAAP, the recognition, measurement, and presentation of expenses and cash flows arising from a lease by a lessee primarily will depend on its classification as a finance or operating lease. However, unlike current GAAP which requires only capital leases to be recognized on the balance sheet, ASU 2016-02 will require both types of leases to be recognized on the balance sheet. This guidance is applicable to the Company's fiscal year beginning on January 1, 2019. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that the adoption of ASU 2016-02 will have on its financial statements.

 

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Note 3.  Fair Value Measurements

 

Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis

 

The Company applies the guidance in ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement, to account for financial assets and liabilities measured on a recurring basis.  Fair value is measured at the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. As such, fair value is a market-based measurement that is determined based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability.

 

The Company uses a fair value hierarchy, which distinguishes between assumptions based on market data (observable inputs) and an entity's own assumptions (unobservable inputs). The guidance requires that fair value measurements be classified and disclosed in one of the following three categories:

·

Level 1: Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities;

·

Level 2: Quoted prices in markets that are not active or inputs which are observable, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the asset or liability; and

·

Level 3: Prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable (i.e., supported by little or no market activity).

 

Determining which category an asset or liability falls within the hierarchy requires significant judgment. The Company evaluates its hierarchy disclosures each reporting period. There were no transfers between Level 1, 2 and 3 during the six months ended June 30, 2018. 

 

The table below presents the assets and liabilities measured and recorded in the financial statements at fair value on a recurring basis at June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 categorized by the level of inputs used in the valuation of each asset and liability:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30, 2018

 

(In thousands)

 

Total

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

66,627

 

$

66,627

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

Total Assets

 

$

66,627

 

$

66,627

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

Total Liabilities

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2017

 

(In thousands)

 

Total

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

66,183

 

$

66,183

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

Total Assets

 

$

66,183

 

$

66,183

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

Total Liabilities

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

The Level 1 assets consist of money market funds, which are actively traded daily.

 

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Note 4.  Property and Equipment

 

At June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, property and equipment, net, consisted of the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30, 

 

December 31, 

 

(In thousands)

    

2018

    

2017

 

Leasehold improvements

 

$

671

 

$

671

 

Laboratory equipment and other

 

 

5,274

 

 

5,261

 

Total property and equipment, at cost

 

 

5,945

 

 

5,932

 

Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

 

4,720

 

 

4,460

 

Property and equipment, net

 

$

1,225

 

$

1,472

 

 

Depreciation and amortization expense on property and equipment was approximately $0.1 million and $0.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and approximately $0.3 million and $0.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. There was less than $0.1 million in non-cash property additions during each of the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.

 

Note 5.  Accrued Expenses 

 

At June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, accrued expenses consisted of the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

June 30, 

 

December 31, 

 

(In thousands)

 

2018

    

2017

 

Payroll and related costs

 

$

2,309

 

$

3,108

 

Clinical and nonclinical trial expenses

 

 

6,163

 

 

3,495

 

Professional and consulting fees

 

 

4,220

 

 

1,317

 

Other

 

 

29

 

 

80

 

Total accrued expenses

 

$

12,721

 

$

8,000

 

 

Included in accrued professional and consulting fees at June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 was $3.8 million and $0.7 million, respectively, of merger-related costs. See Note 12 for further discussion of the fixed expense reimbursement received in July 2018 in connection with the termination of the Merger Agreement.

 

Note 6.  Stockholders’ Equity

 

On June 20, 2018, the Company's stockholders approved an amendment to the Company's Restated Certificate of Incorporation, as amended, to effect a reverse stock split of the Company's outstanding shares of common stock at a ratio within a range from 1-for-4 to 1-for-8 and set the number of authorized shares of the Company’s common stock at a number determined by calculating the product of 280,000,000 multiplied by two times (2x) the reverse stock split ratio.  As further described in Note 12, in July 2018, the Company effected a 1-for-8 reverse stock split of its common stock and set the number of authorized shares of the Company’s common stock at 70,000,000.

 

Common Stock Warrants

 

In connection with various financing transactions, the Company has issued warrants to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock. The Company accounts for warrants as equity instruments, derivative liabilities, or liabilities, depending on the specific terms of the warrant. As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, all of the Company’s outstanding warrants were equity-classified.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Note 6.  Stockholders’ Equity (Continued)

 

The following table summarizes outstanding warrants to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

December 31,

 

Weighted-Average

 

 

 

Description

 

2018

2017

 

Exercise Price

 

Expiration Date

 

Issued in May 2013 financing

 

 —

2,700,791

 

 

$ 3.76

 

May 2018

 

Issued in May 2013 financing (pre-funded)

 

1,977,041

1,977,041

 

 

$ 0.08

 

May 2020

 

Issued in September 2013 financing (pre-funded)

 

521,997

521,997

 

 

$ 0.08

 

Sep 2020

 

Issued in February 2014 financing (pre-funded)

 

269,844

269,844

 

 

$ 0.08

 

Feb 2021

 

Total

 

2,768,882

5,469,673

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The table below is a summary of the Company's warrant activity for the six months ended June 30, 2018:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

Weighted-Average

 

 

Warrants

 

Exercise Price

Outstanding at December 31, 2017

 

5,469,673

 

$

1.90

Issued

 

 —

 

 

 —

Exercised (1)

 

(2,700,791)

 

 

3.76

Expired

 

 —

 

 

 —

Outstanding at June 30, 2018

 

2,768,882

 

$

0.08

 

(1)   During the six months ended June 30, 2018, a related party exercised certain of these warrants as more fully described in Note 10.

 

Note 7.  Alliance Revenue 

 

Alliance revenue for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 represents revenue from contracts with customers accounted for in accordance with ASC Topic 606, which the Company adopted in the first quarter of 2018, as more fully described in Note 2. There was no impact to Alliance revenue previously recognized by the Company as a result of the adoption of ASC Topic 606. 

 

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, Alliance revenue in the accompanying statements of operations and comprehensive loss is comprised of the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

June 30, 

 

June 30, 

(In thousands)

    

2018

    

2017

 

2018

    

2017

GSK collaboration (1)

 

$

141

 

$

186

 

$

283

 

$

557

Vivelix collaboration (2)

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

56

 

 

 —

Other (3)

 

 

22

 

 

 1

 

 

79

 

 

 8

Total Alliance revenue

 

$

163

 

$

187

 

$

418

 

$

565

 

(1)

For all periods presented, revenue recognized primarily relates to the amortization of the deferred up-front payment received at inception of the Company’s collaboration and license agreement with GSK Agreement, as more fully described in Note 8. Revenue recognized for the six months ended June 30, 2017 also includes an additional $0.1 million related to additional research services provided in connection with the collaboration and license agreement with GSK. 

(2)

For the six months ended June 30, 2018, revenue recognized relates to services provided under the research program provided for under the Company’s exclusive license and collaboration agreement with Vivelix, as more fully described in Note 8.

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Note 7.  Alliance Revenue (Continued)

 

(3)

For all periods presented, revenue recognized relates to collaborations which are not material to the Company’s current operations nor expected to be material in the future, including reimbursements by licensees of costs associated with patent maintenance.

 

The following table presents changes in the Company’s contract assets and liabilities during the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2018

(In thousands)

 

Beginning

 

Additions

 

Deductions

 

Ending

Contract assets

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

Contract liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue

 

$

566

 

$

 —

 

$

(331)

 

$

235

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2017

(In thousands)

 

Beginning

 

Additions

 

Deductions

 

Ending

Contract assets

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

Contract liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue

 

$

1,263

 

$

 —

 

$

(465)

 

$

798

 

During each of the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company recognized Alliance revenues of $0.3 million and $0.5 million, respectively, as a result of changes in the contract liability balances associated with its contracts with customers. Revenue recognized during each of the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 were included in the contract liability at the beginning of each respective period. As of June 30, 2018, contract liabilities consisted of deferred revenue related entirely to the Company’s collaboration and license agreement with GSK and were included in Deferred revenue in the accompanying condensed balance sheet.

 

See Note 8 for additional details regarding the Company’s collaboration arrangements.

 

Note 8.  Collaboration and License Agreements 

 

Collaboration with Vivelix

 

In November 2016, the Company entered into an exclusive license and collaboration agreement with Vivelix pursuant to which the Company granted Vivelix worldwide rights to develop and market IMO-9200, an antagonist of TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9, for non-malignant gastrointestinal disorders (the “GI Field” or “Field” as defined in the Vivelix Agreement), and certain back-up compounds to IMO-9200 (the “Vivelix Agreement”). The Company was previously developing IMO-9200 for potential use in selected autoimmune disease indications. However, the Company determined not to proceed with internal development of IMO-9200 because the large autoimmune disease indications for which IMO-9200 had been developed did not fit within the strategic focus of the Company. Under the terms of the Vivelix Agreement, Vivelix is solely responsible for the development and commercialization of IMO-9200 and any designated back-up compounds. In connection with the Vivelix Agreement, Idera also transferred certain drug material to Vivelix for Vivelix’s use in its development activities.

 

Pursuant to the Vivelix Agreement, Vivelix could request that Idera create, characterize and perform research on back-up compounds (the “Research Program”).  Such activity was to be mutually agreed upon and moderated by the Joint Research Committee (“JRC”) established under the Vivelix Agreement.  The research period commenced with the execution of the agreement and may last for up to three years. As a result of the Company’s decision to wind-down its discovery operations as described in Note 12, in July 2018, the Company has informed Vivelix that no additional research projects will be undertaken by Idera.

 

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Note 8.  Collaboration and License Agreements (Continued)

 

Vivelix has certain rights under the agreement whereby it may exercise (i) the right of first refusal to develop and commercialize products in any available field (“Right of First Refusal”), (ii) the right of first negotiation to obtain an exclusive license for any compound controlled by Idera that has activity in the field of inflammatory bowel disease (“Right of First Negotiation”) and (iii) the right to request an expanded Field beyond the GI Field (“Expanded Field Option”).    

 

Under the terms of the Vivelix Agreement, the Company received an upfront, non-refundable fee of $15 million.  In addition, the Company will be eligible for future IMO-9200 related development, regulatory and sales milestone payments totaling up to $140 million, including development and regulatory milestones totaling up to $65 million and sales milestones totaling up to $75 million, and escalating royalties ranging from the mid single-digits to low double-digits of global net sales, which percentages are subject to reduction under agreed upon circumstances.  As it relates to back-up compounds, the Company will be eligible for related designation payments and development, regulatory and sales milestone payments totaling up to $52.5 million, including development and regulatory milestones totaling up to $35 million and sales milestones totaling up to $17.5 million and escalating royalties ranging from the mid single-digits to low double-digits of global net sales, which percentages are subject to reduction under agreed upon circumstances. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company has performed research services, as requested by Vivelix and at Vivelix’s expense.

 

At the effective date of the Vivelix Agreement, Baker Bros. Advisors LP and certain of its affiliated funds (collectively, “Baker Brothers”) beneficially owned approximately 7.0% of the Company’s outstanding common stock.  Baker Brothers also owned a controlling financial interest of Vivelix at the effective date of the Vivelix Agreement and as of December 31, 2017.  Affiliates of Baker Brothers constitute two of the four directors on the board of directors of Vivelix and two of the seven directors on the board of directors of the Company.  However, the boards of the Company and Vivelix share no common board members.

 

Accounting Analysis under ASC 606

 

In evaluating the Vivelix Agreement in accordance with ASC Topic 606, the Company concluded that the contract counterparty, Vivelix, is a customer. The Company identified the following performance obligations as of the inception of agreement: (i) a research and commercialization license for IMO-9200 and back-up compounds to IMO-9200 (the “IMO-9200 License”) and (ii) drug materials transferred, which were both deemed to be distinct. The Company determined that participation in the JRC was deemed immaterial in the context of the contract. Consistent with the guidance under ASC 606-10-25-16A, the Company disregarded immaterial promised goods and services when determining performance obligations.

 

The Company concluded that the IMO-9200 License was distinct within the context of the contract (i.e. separately identifiable) because it has stand-alone value from other promised goods and services as Vivelix could benefit from the IMO-9200 License on a stand-alone basis and sell the compound in the market without any additional involvement or participation from Idera. Additionally, Idera has no further obligations related to the IMO-9200 License. In the event that Vivelix does not make a designated compound payment, the license to back-up compounds reverts back to Idera at the end of the research term at no cost or payment by either party.  The services provided under the Research Program relate to the back-up compounds and Vivelix would be able to conduct research and development activities with external third parties, as IMO-9200 is at an advanced enough stage where Idera’s expertise would not be required.  Accordingly, the IMO-9200 License is a separate performance obligation.

 

The Company concluded that the drug materials transferred identified at the inception are also distinct within the context of the contract (i.e. separately identifiable) because they have standalone value from other promised goods and services based on their nature.  Accordingly, the drug materials transferred are a separate performance obligation.

 

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Note 8.  Collaboration and License Agreements (Continued)

 

Allocable arrangement consideration at inception of the Vivelix Agreement was comprised of the up-front payment of $15 million. The $15 million was allocated based on the relative stand-alone selling prices of each performance obligation.  Allocated revenue associated with the IMO-9200 License was recognized at the inception of the Vivelix Agreement in the fourth quarter of 2016 as Vivelix was granted an exclusive, perpetual license to develop and commercialize IMO-9200 and certain back-up compounds to IMO-9200, subject to certain designation milestone and royalty payments, and the performance obligations of Idera under the agreement were extinguished at that point. Allocable revenue associated with drug materials transferred shortly after the inception of the agreement was recognized upon delivery, also in the fourth quarter of 2016.

 

At inception of the contract, the transaction price included only the $15.0 million up-front consideration received. None of the development and commercialization milestones were included in the transaction price, as all milestone amounts were fully constrained. As part of its evaluation of the constraint, the Company considered numerous factors, including that receipt of the milestones is outside the control of the Company and contingent upon success in future clinical trials and the licensee’s efforts. Similarly, other variable consideration related to services that may be provided under the Research Program and back-up compound designation payments were fully constrained. Any consideration related to sales-based royalties will be recognized when the related sales occur, provided that the reported sales are reliably measurable and the Company has no remaining performance obligations, as such sales were determined to relate predominantly to the license granted to Vivelix and therefore have also been excluded from the transaction price. The Company re-evaluates the transaction price in each reporting period and as uncertain events are resolved or other changes in circumstances occur.

 

Revenue associated with goods and services provided to Vivelix under the Research Program have been immaterial to date and such revenue is recognized as the related performance obligations under each research project are satisfied. See Note 7 for details on revenue recognized in connection with the Company’s collaboration with Vivelix for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.

 

Collaboration with GSK

 

In November 2015, the Company entered into a collaboration and license agreement with GSK to license, research, develop and commercialize pharmaceutical compounds from the Company’s nucleic acid chemistry technology for the treatment of selected targets in renal disease (the “GSK Agreement”). The initial collaboration term is currently anticipated to last between two and four years. In connection with the GSK Agreement, GSK identified an initial target for the Company to attempt to identify a potential population of development candidates to address such target under a mutually agreed upon research plan, which is estimated to take 36 months to complete. From the population of identified development candidates, GSK may designate one development candidate in its sole discretion to move forward into clinical development. If GSK designates a development candidate, GSK would be solely responsible for the development and commercialization activities for that designated development candidate.

 

The GSK Agreement also provided GSK with the option to select up to two additional targets at any time during the first two years of the GSK Agreement for further research under mutually agreed upon research plans. Upon selecting additional targets, GSK then had the option to designate one development candidate for each additional target, at which time GSK would have sole responsibility to develop and commercialize each such designated development candidate. GSK did not select any additional targets for research through expiry of the option period.

 

In accordance with the GSK Agreement, a Joint Steering Committee (“JSC”) was formed with equal representation from Idera and GSK. The responsibilities of the JSC, include, but are not limited to monitoring the progress of the collaboration, reviewing research plans and dealing with disputes that may arise between the parties. If a dispute cannot be resolved by the JSC, GSK has final decision making authority.

 

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Note 8.  Collaboration and License Agreements (Continued)

 

Under the terms of the GSK Agreement, the Company received a $2.5 million upfront, non-refundable, non-creditable cash payment upon the execution of the GSK Agreement.  Additionally, the Company was eligible to receive a total of up to approximately $100 million in license, research, clinical development and commercialization milestone payments, of which $9 million of these milestone payments would have been payable by GSK upon the identification of the additional targets, the completion of current and future research plans and the designation of development candidates and $89 million would have been payable by GSK upon the achievement of clinical milestones and commercial milestones. As a result of GSK not selecting additional targets during the two-year option period, the Company is now only eligible to receive a total of up to approximately $20 million in license, research, clinical development and commercialization milestone payments, of which $1 million of these milestone payments would be payable by GSK upon the designation of a development candidate from the initial target and $17 million would be payable by GSK upon the achievement of clinical milestones and commercial milestones. In addition, the Company is eligible to receive royalty payments on sales upon commercialization at varying rates of up to 5% on annual net sales, as defined in the GSK Agreement.

 

Accounting Analysis under ASC 606

 

In evaluating the GSK Agreement in accordance with ASC Topic 606, the Company concluded that the contract counterparty, GSK, is a customer. The Company identified the following performance obligations as of the inception of the agreement: (i) research services, combined with the license for Idera’s proprietary technology related to the initial target (collectively, the “Collaboration License and Research Services”) and (ii) daily options to extend the Collaboration License and Research Services. The Company determined that participation in the JSC and materials transferred were deemed immaterial in the context of the contract. Consistent with the guidance under ASC 606-10-25-16A, the Company disregarded immaterial promised goods and services when determining performance obligations.

 

The Company concluded that the research services related to the initial target and collaboration license to the Company’s proprietary technology related to the initial target were not capable of being distinct as the collaboration license related to the initial target is highly interdependent upon the research services to be provided related to the initial target. As it relates to the assessment of standalone value, the Company determined that GSK cannot fully exploit the value of the collaboration license without receipt of the research services from the Company. The research services involve unique skills and specialized expertise, particularly as it relates to the Company’s proprietary technology, which is not available in the marketplace. Accordingly, GSK must obtain the research services from the Company which significantly limits the ability for GSK to utilize the collaboration license for its intended purpose on a standalone basis. Similarly, the Company concluded that the daily option to extend the collaboration license and the daily option to extend the research services were also highly interdependent as the license has no value to GSK without the accompanying research services using the Company’s proprietary technology. Accordingly, the Collaboration License and Research Services were determined to represent a single performance obligation and the daily options to extend the Collaboration License and Research Services were determined to represent a single performance obligation. Factors considered in this determination included, among other things, the capabilities of the collaborator, whether any other vendor sells the item separately, whether the value of the deliverable is dependent on the other elements in the arrangement, whether there are other vendors that can provide the items and if the customer could use the item for its intended purpose without the other deliverables in the arrangement.

 

Allocable arrangement consideration at inception of the GSK Agreement consisted of the up-front payment of $2.5 million. The $2.5 million was allocated based on the relative stand-alone selling prices of each performance obligation, calculated based on the expected period of time over which the initial license term will be in place, as well as the expected period of time over which the optional renewals occur. The Company will recognize the consideration allocated to the Collaboration License and Research Services over time as GSK is receiving the benefit of the Company’s expertise and know-how on an on-going basis as the research progresses towards the goal of the development candidate designation for the initial target. The exercise of the daily options to extend the Collaboration License and Research Services are treated as a continuation of the contract and allocated consideration is recognized point-in-time upon commencement of each daily exercise.

 

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Note 8.  Collaboration and License Agreements (Continued)

 

At inception of the contract, the transaction price included only the $2.5 million up-front consideration received. None of the development and commercialization milestones were included in the transaction price, as all milestone amounts were fully constrained. As part of its evaluation of the constraint, the Company considered numerous factors, including that receipt of the milestones is outside the control of the Company and contingent upon success in future clinical trials and the licensee’s efforts. Any consideration related to sales-based royalties will be recognized when the related sales occur, provided that the reported sales are reliably measurable and the Company has no remaining performance obligations, as such sales were determined to relate predominantly to the license granted to GSK and therefore have also been excluded from the transaction price. The Company re-evaluates the transaction price in each reporting period and as uncertain events are resolved or other changes in circumstances occur.

 

The up-front payment of $2.5 million was recorded as deferred revenue in the Company’s balance sheet upon receipt and is currently being recognized as revenue on a straight line basis over the estimated 36 month research plan period, which approximates the timing in which performance obligations are satisfied. See Note 7 for details on revenue recognized in connection with the Company’s collaboration with GSK for each of the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017.

 

Note 9.  Stock-Based Compensation

 

Equity Compensation Plans

 

2013 Stock Incentive Plan

 

The Company's board of directors adopted the 2013 Stock Incentive Plan (as amended to date, the “2013 Plan”), which was approved by the Company’s stockholders effective July 26, 2013. The 2013 Plan is intended to further align the interests of the Company and its stockholders with its employees, including its officers, non-employee directors, consultants and advisers by providing equity-based incentives. The 2013 Plan allows for the issuance of up to such number of shares of the Company’s common stock as equal to (i) 3,153,057 shares of common stock; plus (ii) such additional number of shares of common stock (up to 868,372 shares) as is equal to the sum of the number of shares of common stock subject to awards granted under the Company’s 2005 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2005 Plan”) or the Company’s 2008 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2008 Plan” and, together with the 2005 Plan, the “Existing Plans”) which awards expire, terminate or are otherwise surrendered, canceled, forfeited or repurchased by the Company at their original issuance price pursuant to a contractual repurchase right (subject, however, in the case of incentive stock options to any limitations of the Internal Revenue Code). 

 

As of June 30, 2018, options to purchase a total of 2,050,232 shares of common stock were outstanding and up to 1,308,485 shares of common stock remained available for grant under the 2013 Plan. The Company has not made any awards pursuant to other equity incentive plans, including the Existing Plans, since the Company’s stockholders approved the 2013 Plan. As of June 30, 2018, options to purchase a total of 511,093 shares of common stock were outstanding under these earlier plans. 

 

In addition, as of June 30, 2018, non-statutory stock options to purchase an aggregate of 393,750 shares of common stock were outstanding that were issued outside of the 2013 Plan to certain employees in 2017, 2015 and 2014 pursuant to the Nasdaq inducement grant exception as a material component of new hires’ employment compensation.

 

2017 Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

The Company’s board of directors adopted the 2017 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “2017 ESPP”) which was approved by the Company’s stockholders and became effective on June 7, 2017. The 2017 ESPP provides for the issuance of up to 62,500 shares of common stock to participating employees of the Company or its subsidiaries. Participation is limited to employees that would not own 5% or more of the total combined voting power or value of the stock of the Company after the grant. As of June 30, 2018, 44,006 shares remained available for issuance under the 2017 ESPP.

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Note 9.  Stock-Based Compensation (Continued)

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, the Company issued 13,112 and 10,418 shares of common stock, respectively, under the 2017 ESPP and the Company’s 1995 Employee Stock Purchase Plan and received proceeds of approximately $0.2 million and $0.1 million during each period, respectively, as a result of employee stock purchases.

 

Accounting for Stock-based Compensation

 

The Company recognizes non-cash compensation expense for stock-based awards under the Company’s equity incentive plans over an award’s requisite service period, or vesting period, using the straight-line attribution method, based on their grant date fair value determined using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The Company also recognizes non-cash compensation for stock purchases made under the 2017 ESPP.  The fair value of the discounted purchases made under the Company’s 2017 ESPP is calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The fair value of the look-back provision plus the 15% discount is recognized as compensation expense over each plan period.

 

Total stock-based compensation expense attributable to stock-based payments made to employees and directors and employee stock purchases included in operating expenses in the Company's statements of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

June 30,

 

June 30,

(in thousands)

 

2018

    

2017

 

2018

    

2017

Stock-based compensation:

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

Research and development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plans

 

$

29

    

$

20

 

$

51

    

$

42

Equity Incentive Plans

 

 

520

    

 

4,627

 

 

1,076

    

 

5,341

 

 

$

549

    

$

4,647

 

$

1,127

    

$

5,383

General and administrative

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plans

 

$

18

    

$

11

 

$

32

    

$

30

Equity Incentive Plans

 

 

971

    

 

1,100

 

 

1,968

    

 

2,129

 

 

$

989

    

$

1,111

 

$

2,000

    

$

2,159

Total stock-based compensation expense

 

$

1,538

    

$

5,758

 

$

3,127

    

$

7,542

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, the weighted average fair market value of stock options granted was $9.76 and $8.00, respectively. The following weighted average assumptions apply to the options to purchase 569,199 and 488,915 shares of common stock granted to employees and directors during the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 

 

 

    

2018

    

2017

 

Average risk free interest rate